July 2016

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Privacy to Enable “Drones for Good”

In her recent blog, Paula J. Bruening, Senior Counsel for Global Privacy Policy, Intel, highlights the work of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration multi-stakeholder working group and the best practices it released on drone privacy, transparency, and accountability, especially as it enables the deployment of drones for purposes that will benefit society.

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Lauren Smith Featured on WXYZ-TV

“Some of the information may be going to the manufacturer, some may be staying locally on the car, some may be going to your insurance company if you’ve selected that, some may be going to some technology you’ve opted into. So we’re trying to clarify for consumers what kind of information your car may collect and where the information is being sent.”

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Kids, Connected Toys and Devices, and Privacy

At FPF, we recognize the benefits that connected home technologies can provide to individuals, families, and kids. We also know that privacy issues can make or break adoption of connected home tech – particularly questions about whether kids’ privacy and security are sufficiently safeguarded. Families are using voice controlled devices to search the web, play games, and order products.

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Podcast: Lauren Smith Speaks with Bloomberg Law

Lauren Smith, Policy Counsel, spoke with Bloomberg Law today about connected cars and the legal implications of data collection. Lauren discussed the importance of privacy and highlighted many principles that are covered in the our report, “The Connected Car and Privacy: Navigating New Data Issues.”

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Big Data and Elections

Big data analytics offers, “great new ways to engage with voters on the things that really matter to them, which results in more motivated, and hopefully better informed, participants in the electoral process, and likely higher turnouts on election day.”

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Podcast: John Verdi speaks with IAPP

John Verdi, our Vice President of Policy, speaks with Angelique Carson of the International Association of Privacy Professionals about his previous work with the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and his new role with the Future of Privacy Forum.