Posts by FPF Staff

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Policymakers, regulators, and privacy executives interact with latest connected tech at FPF’s Third Annual Tech Lab

FPF held the Third Annual Tech Lab Open House Monday, March 26, 2018, at our offices in Washington, D.C. The Tech Lab Open House provided an opportunity for us to host Privacy Commissioners and FPF members who were in town for the International Association of Privacy Professional’s Global Privacy Summit. The event also provided a rare occasion for policy makers, regulators, and thought leaders to interact with the latest in privacy-impacting gadgets and new technologies.

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The Elise Berkower Memorial Fellowship

FPF launched a new fellowship in memory of Elise Berkower. Elise was a senior privacy executive at global measurement and data analytics company Nielsen for nearly a decade and was a valued, longtime member of the FPF Advisory Board. FPF graciously acknowledges the Berkower Family and the Nielsen Foundation as founding sponsors of the Elise Berkower Memorial Fellowship.

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Future of Privacy Forum Launches Fellowship in Memory of Privacy Hero Elise Berkower

Washington, DC – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum announced the launch of a new fellowship in memory of Elise Berkower. Elise was a senior privacy executive at global measurement and data analytics company Nielsen for nearly a decade and was a valued, longtime member of the FPF Advisory Board. FPF graciously acknowledges the Berkower Family and the Nielsen Foundation as founding sponsors of the Elise Berkower Memorial Fellowship.

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Taming The Golem: Challenges of Ethical Algorithmic Decision-Making

This article examines the potential for bias and discrimination in automated algorithmic decision-making. As a group of commentators recently asserted, “[t]he accountability mechanisms and legal standards that govern such decision processes have not kept pace with technology.” Yet this article rejects an approach that depicts every algorithmic process as a “black box” that is inevitably plagued by bias and potential injustice.

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FPF Welcomes New Senior Fellow

FPF is pleased to welcome Stanley W. Crosley as a senior fellow. Stanley has over 20 years of applied experience in law, data governance and data strategy across a broad sector of the economy, including from inside multinational corporations, academia, large law firm and boutique practices, not-for-profit advocacy organizations, and governmental agencies, and is the Co-Director of the Indiana University Center for Law, Ethics, and Applied Research in Health Information (CLEAR), is Counsel to the law firm of Drinker Biddle & Reath in Washington, DC, and Principal of Crosley Law Offices, LLC.  Stan is a Senior Strategist at the Information Accountability Foundation and a Senior Fellow at the Future of Privacy Forum, where he leads health policy efforts.

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This Year’s Six Must-Read Privacy Papers: The Future of Privacy Forum Announces Recipients of Annual Privacy Award

Washington, DC – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum announced the winners of the 8th Annual Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award. The PPPM Award recognizes leading privacy scholarship that is relevant to policymakers in the U.S. Congress, at U.S. federal agencies, and for data protection authorities abroad. The winners of the 2017 PPPM Award are:

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Unfairness By Algorithm: Distilling the Harms of Automated Decision-Making

Analysis of personal data can be used to improve services, advance research, and combat discrimination. However, such analysis can also create valid concerns about differential treatment of individuals or harmful impacts on vulnerable communities. These concerns can be amplified when automated decision-making uses sensitive data (such as race, gender, or familial status), impacts protected classes, or affects individuals’ eligibility for housing, employment, or other core services. When seeking to identify harms, it is important to appreciate the context of interactions between individuals, companies, and governments—including the benefits provided by automated decision-making frameworks, and the fallibility of human decision-making.