Press Releases and Statements

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Immuta and the Future of Privacy Forum Release First-Ever Risk Management Framework for AI and Machine Learning  

College Park, MD – June 26, 2018 – Immuta and the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) today announced the first-ever framework for practitioners to manage risk in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) models. Their joint whitepaper, Beyond Explainability: A Practical Guide to Managing Risk in Machine Learning Models, provides business executives, data scientists, and compliance professionals with a strategic guide for governing the legal, privacy, and ethical risks associated with this technology.

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FPF Testifies Before Congress on Promoting and Protecting Student Privacy

Washington, D.C– Today, Future of Privacy Forum’s (FPF) Amelia Vance, Director of the Education Privacy Project, will deliver testimony in a hearing before the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, “Protecting Privacy, Promoting Data Security: Exploring How Schools and States Keep Data Safe.” In her prepared testimony, Vance will comment on how states, districts and ed tech companies can work together in ensuring student privacy.

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FPF Comments on CA Public Utilities Commission Autonomous Vehicle Passenger Service Proceeding

Last week, the Future of Privacy Forum filed written comments in response to the California Public Utilities Commission’s proposed decision authorizing pilot programs for passenger service in Autonomous Vehicles. The CPUC is a consumer protection agency that oversees, among other topics, provision of passenger service in the state. The proposed decision called for a number of criteria to be met by companies seeking to operate AV passenger service, including reporting of communications between passengers and remote operators of driverless AVs, as well as aggregated operations data.

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FPF Comments on Minnesota Student Privacy Bill HF 1507

Yesterday, the Future of Privacy Forum submitted written comments to members of the Minnesota House of Representatives in response to the pending student privacy bill, the Student Data Privacy Act (HF 1507). FPF expressed concerns about the proposed language of the bill, which would create conflicting requirements for schools and education technology companies, and likely cause unintended consequences for Minnesota schools and students.

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FPF Welcomes New Members to the Education Privacy Project

We are thrilled to announce four new members of FPF’s Education Privacy Project. Led by Amelia Vance, Director of Education Privacy, the Project works to equip and connect parents, educators, state and local education agencies, ed tech companies, and other stakeholders with substantive practices, policies, and other solutions to address education privacy challenges.

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Future of Privacy Forum Launches Fellowship in Memory of Privacy Hero Elise Berkower

Washington, DC – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum announced the launch of a new fellowship in memory of Elise Berkower. Elise was a senior privacy executive at global measurement and data analytics company Nielsen for nearly a decade and was a valued, longtime member of the FPF Advisory Board. FPF graciously acknowledges the Berkower Family and the Nielsen Foundation as founding sponsors of the Elise Berkower Memorial Fellowship.

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This Year’s Six Must-Read Privacy Papers: The Future of Privacy Forum Announces Recipients of Annual Privacy Award

Washington, DC – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum announced the winners of the 8th Annual Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award. The PPPM Award recognizes leading privacy scholarship that is relevant to policymakers in the U.S. Congress, at U.S. federal agencies, and for data protection authorities abroad. The winners of the 2017 PPPM Award are:

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New Study: Companies are Increasingly Making Data Accessible to Academic Researchers, but Opportunities Exist for Greater Collaboration

Washington, DC – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum released a new study, Understanding Corporate Data Sharing Decisions: Practices, Challenges, and Opportunities for Sharing Corporate Data with Researchers. In this report, FPF reveals findings from research and interviews with experts in the academic and industry communities. Three main areas are discussed: 1) The extent to which leading companies make data available to support published research that contributes to public knowledge; 2) Why and how companies share data for academic research; and 3) The risks companies perceive to be associated with such sharing, as well as their strategies for mitigating those risks.