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Homomorphic Encryption Signals the Future for Socially Valuable Research on Private Data

Encryption has become a cornerstone of the technologies that support communication, commerce, banking, and myriad other essential activities in today’s digital world. In an announcement this week, Google revealed a new marketing attribution tool that relies on a particular type of advanced encryption to allow advertisers to understand whether their online ads have resulted in in-store purchases.

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Smart Cities

Cities and communities generate data through a vast and growing network of connected technologies that power new and innovative services ranging from apps that can help drivers find parking spots to sensors that can improve water quality. Such services improve individual lives and make cities more efficient. While smart city technologies can raise privacy issues, sophisticated data privacy programs can mitigate these concerns while preserving the benefits of cities that are cleaner, faster, safer, more efficient, and more sustainable.

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Uber and Location Permission

Uber recently announced that its iOS app will require access to location data either “Always” or “Never.” Given some of the confusion about the change, we are writing to help consumers better understand what Uber modified and why.

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Protecting Privacy in the Age of Connected Toys

The paper describes the current landscape of connected toys, identifying what distinguishes them from conventional toys and other smart toys. The white paper analyzes existing regulations under COPPA that have established important safeguards for information collected from children, and how those regulations apply.

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Advisory Board Reviewers for PPPM 2016

Each year, FPF awards the Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award to the authors of leading privacy research and analytical work that is relevant to policymakers in the United States Congress, at U.S. federal agencies, and for data protection authorities abroad.

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Spotlight on PPPM Judges

This week, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) will announce the winners of the 2016-17 Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award. Each year, FPF awards the Privacy Papers for Policymakers Award to the authors of leading privacy research and analytical work that is relevant to policymakers in the United States Congress, at U.S. federal agencies, and for data protection authorities abroad.