White Papers

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Parents Support School Tech and Data, But Want Privacy Assurances: FPF 2016 Parent Survey

In 2015, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) set out to gain a better understanding of what public school parents actually know and want concerning the use of technology and collection of data in their children’s schools, as well as their perspectives on the benefits and risks of student data use within the educational system.

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Seven Basic Security Checks for Evaluating Educational Platforms

FPF has produced a checklist to assist parents and schools in considering the “basics” of security standards on new ed tech products and services they may be considering or using. In on-line security, there is unfortunately no “one size fits all” solution, but with so many products and services available, this checklist is designed to provide some initial key triggers of areas that either meet a basic threshold, or might serve as discussion points for further review with the company involved.

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Supporting Parental Choice for Student Data

Today, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) released, “Supporting Parental Choice for Student Data.” The paper discusses the importance of trusting parents to make the final decision on when and where to share their child’s educational information outside of the school environment.

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Future of Privacy Forum Releases Best Practices for Consumer Wearables and Wellness Apps and Devices

Washington, DC – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) released Best Practices for Consumer Wearables and Wellness Apps and Devices, a detailed set of guidelines that responsible companies can follow to ensure they provide practical privacy protections for consumer-generated health and wellness data. The document was produced with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and incorporates input from a wide range of stakeholders including companies, advocates, and regulators.

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Examining the Privacy Implications of Smart TVs

The Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) filed its report, Always On: Privacy Implications of Microphone-Enabled Devices, with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in response to the Commission’s request for public comments regarding the privacy implications of Smart TVs. On December 7, 2016, the FTC will be holding a Smart TV Workshop to explore the intricacies of tracking technologies and best practices for addressing consumer privacy on entertainment systems.

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FPF, Intel, and PrecisionHawk Release Drones and Privacy by Design: Embedding Privacy Enhancing Technology in Unmanned Aircraft

Washington, DC – Today, in response to the Administration’s call-to-action on privacy protections related to drone operations, Future of Privacy Forum (FPF), Intel, and PrecisionHawk released Drones and Privacy by Design: Embedding Privacy Enhancing Technology in Unmanned Aircraft. The report highlights examples of privacy enhancing technologies and “Privacy-by-Design” applied to drones.

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The Future of Privacy Forum and EY Examine Speech Recognition and Smart Devices in New Paper

Washington, DC – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF), in collaboration with Ernst & Young LLP, released Always On: Privacy Implications of Microphone-Enabled Devices, a new paper that explores how speech recognition technology fits into a broader scheme of “always listening” technologies. The paper identifies emerging practices by which manufacturers and developers can alleviate privacy concerns and build consumer trust in the ways that data is collected, stored, and analyzed.

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Always on: Privacy Implications of Microphone-Enabled Devices

Is your smart TV listening to your conversations? Are your children’s toys spying on your family?

These questions are being raised as the next generation of Internet-connected devices enters the market. Such devices, often dubbed “always on,” include televisions, cars, toys and home personal assistants, many of which now include microphones and speech-recognition capabilities.

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19 Times Data Analysis Empowered Students and Schools

Which Students Succeed and Why?   “Thoughtful use of education data has tremendous potential to improve and address inequities in America’s education system. Scientists better understand how the brain incorporates new information and skills. Educators have a more accurate sense of student progress and potential risk for dropping out. Students and teachers use more detailed […]