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FPF Comments on NHTSA’s V2V Rulemaking

Yesterday, the Future of Privacy Forum submitted written comments to the Department of Transportation and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration in response to their Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Vehicle to Vehicle Communications.

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On April 11, Windows Users Get Improved Privacy Protections from Microsoft

FPF is pleased to see the major privacy advances in Microsoft’s upcoming update to Windows 10. The Creator’s Update version of Windows 10 will provide a new privacy dashboard, allows users to limit telemetry information sent back to Microsoft, provides a detailed look at the telemetry information collected, and makes it easy for users to understand what data is collected when they choose basic or advanced installations.

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Future of Privacy Forum Releases Interactive Tool for Understanding the Technologies Powering Smart Cities

Brussels, Belgium – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) released Shedding Light on Smart City Privacy, a new tool designed to help citizens, companies, and communities understand the technologies at the heart of smart city and smart community projects as well as their potential impact on privacy. The guide was released by FPF Policy Counsel, Kelsey Finch, during the panel Cities of the Future, Data of the Present: Protecting Privacy and Fostering Development at RightsCon Brussels, a conference exploring the societal impact of technology and policy.

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Chasing the Golden Goose: What is the path to effective anonymisation?

Searching for effective methods and frameworks of de-identification often looks like chasing the Golden Goose of privacy law. For each answer that claims to unlock the question of anonymisation, there seems to be a counter-answer that declares anonymisation dead. In an attempt to de-mystify this race and un-tangle de-identification in practical ways, the Future of Privacy Forum and the Brussels Privacy Hub joined forces to organize the Brussels Symposium on De-identification – “Identifiability: Policy and Practical Solutions for Anonymisation and Pseudonymisation”.

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Good Data Collaborative to Advance Responsible Data Use

The Good Data Collaborative seeks to identify gaps in resources to assist civil society in using data responsibly through distinct activities: a landscape assessment of existing tools and resources, as well as academic literature; a consultation with key stakeholders and current and potential users of the resources; and a redesigned, central repository of resources to help them address responsible data challenges in their work.