Posts by Melanie Bates

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5th Annual Public Policy Conference on the Law & Economics of Privacy and Data Security

The Program on Economics & Privacy at George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School and the Future of Privacy Forum are seeking papers to explore the development of a benefit-cost framework in privacy policy. Scholars from an interdisciplinary background, including economics, law, public policy, business and marketing, are encouraged to submit abstracts for consideration.

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Future of Privacy Forum Releases Interactive Tool for Understanding the Technologies Powering Smart Cities

Brussels, Belgium – Today, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) released Shedding Light on Smart City Privacy, a new tool designed to help citizens, companies, and communities understand the technologies at the heart of smart city and smart community projects as well as their potential impact on privacy. The guide was released by FPF Policy Counsel, Kelsey Finch, during the panel Cities of the Future, Data of the Present: Protecting Privacy and Fostering Development at RightsCon Brussels, a conference exploring the societal impact of technology and policy.

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FPF Relaunches Global Calendar of Privacy Events

FPF has officially relaunched the Privacy Calendar. The Privacy Calendar can be accessed at www.privacycalendar.org and is a global calendar of privacy-related events. With its interactive design, users have the ability to search for an event by name, organizer, or city and use the online submission form to add an event. Events may also be submitted by emailing [email protected]

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FPF Joins Coalition to Reject DHS Proposal to Demand Passwords to Enter the U.S.

Yesterday, FPF joined a broad coalition in a joint statement to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) opposing password demands of travelers. Secretary John Kelly suggested DHS could require non-citizens to provide the passwords to their social media accounts as a condition of entering the country. As articulated in the letter, the practice of demanding social media passwords would not increase the security of U.S. citizens and would jeopardize the fundamental rights of people in the U.S. and abroad.