Blog

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Privacy to Enable “Drones for Good”

In her recent blog, Paula J. Bruening, Senior Counsel for Global Privacy Policy, Intel, highlights the work of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration multi-stakeholder working group and the best practices it released on drone privacy, transparency, and accountability, especially as it enables the deployment of drones for purposes that will benefit society.

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Kids, Connected Toys and Devices, and Privacy

At FPF, we recognize the benefits that connected home technologies can provide to individuals, families, and kids. We also know that privacy issues can make or break adoption of connected home tech – particularly questions about whether kids’ privacy and security are sufficiently safeguarded. Families are using voice controlled devices to search the web, play games, and order products.

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Examining Ethics, Privacy, and Research Reviews

Today, the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) and the Ohio State University’s Program on Data and Governance are holding a discussion of ethics, privacy and practical research reviews in corporate settings. This timely event, which follows the White House’s call to develop strong data ethics frameworks, convened corporate and academic leaders to discuss how to integrate ethical and privacy considerations into innovative data projects and research.

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Advancing Knowledge Regarding Practical Solutions for De-Identification of Personal Data: A Call for Papers

De-identification of personal information plays a central role in current privacy policy, law, and practice. Yet there are deep disagreements about the efficacy of de-identification to mitigate privacy risks. Some critics argue that it is impossible to eliminate privacy harms from publicly released data using de-identification because other available data sets will allow attackers to identify individuals through linkage attacks.

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Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services

The Future of Privacy Forum filed comments with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in response to the FCC’s proposed rules regarding the privacy and data practices of Internet Services Providers (ISPs). The FCC’s March 31, 2016 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM or Notice) seeks to regulate ISP’s data practices pursuant to Section 222 of the Communications Act – a sector-specific statute that includes detailed requirements that apply to telecommunications services, but does not apply to other services offered by broadband providers nor to online services operating at the edge of the network (e.g. web sites).